Architectural Photographer | San Francisco Bay Area | Russell Abraham

Garay House

Danville House

One Hundred Grand Apartments

340 Fremont Apartments

Golden Gate Rec Center

SFO Airport FireHouse3

Warm Springs BART Station

Santa Clara Square

Riverpark Tower II

Telegraph Hill House

Pac Heights House

Sinbad Creek

Asian Oasis

Portola Valley Home

Los Gatos Home

Tahoe Family Retreat

Politzer Drive

One Henry Adams

The Alise

California Pizza Kitchen

Silicon Valley Courtyard by Marriott

ARMA Museum and Resort

COMO Shambhala Estate

Francis Ford Coppola Winery

Hotel Griffon

Il Fornaio Restaurant

The Bristol Hotel

Food

Furniture

Looking at San Francisco's Rich and Varied Hotels
View of the Luisa Tetrazzini Suite at Chateau Tivoli, Steiner St, San Francisco.
Looking at San Francisco's Rich and Varied Hotels

San Francisco has been a tourist destination long before the word tourist became popular.  Its legendary hotels have been shelters for presidents, kings and opera stars since the 19th Century.  As part of our on-going travel book project, San Francisco Secrets, we took another look at a handful of hotels that share some of the citys rich and eccentric past and a few new ones that caught our attention.

The Palace Hotel on Market St. is one of San Franciscos most legendary.  Enrico Caruso was tossed out of bed by the 1906 Earthquake here.  President Warren Harding died here under less than respectable circumstances.  The Palace, with its grand glass domed central hall, the Garden Court, is the most classical elegant meeting space in the Western U.S.
Pied Piper Bar and Grill at the Palace Hotel, featuring the famous painting by artist Maxfield Parrish.

The Clift is one of the finest examples of Art Deco exuberance found anywhere.  What is amazing is the fact that it was not destroyed when Philippe Starck remodeled it 15 years ago.  Having a drink in the Redwood Room should be on everyones bucket list.

Lobby inside the Clift, boasting eclectic furniture including Philippe-Starck-designed Big Arm Chair.
The W San Francisco hotel should be a corporate cookie cutter type of place serving the convention crowd.  Its not.  It is a chic, well-designed modern space that is several steps above it's south of Market neighbors.  It has a hip, sophisticated uptown look in a downtown environment.  Third and Howard St. is a busy intersection, but once inside the hotel, you dont realize that you are in the heart of the city.
Living room fireplace.

View from the second floor lounge.  The design concept for the lobby was inspired by the city, laid out in a grid pattern, constantly being interrupted by periods of shifting fog.

Chateau Tivoli is one of those 19th Century Victorian mansions that survived the fire of 1906, the hippies of the 1960s and the New Age communalists of the 1970s.  Today it is a beautifully restored mansion that reminds us that this was always a classy place.  You can almost hear the opera stars of old who were guests back in the day.  Their names along with other famous San Francisco persona are on the doors of each of the nine rooms and suites.

The parlor inside Chateau Tivoli, artfully restored with Victorian-era and furnishings and decor.
A View From the Other Side of the Camera
We thought we would get a bit personal and give you a look at what happens on the other side of the camera.  Kristen Paulin is always documenting the job so she can tease her midwestern friends on Facebook.  Here are a few snapshots from behind the scenes.
Food shot inside the Garden Court at the Palace Hotel.
Working on the eclipse day in August.  Thank you, Catharine Garber of FGY Architects, for supplying our eclipse glasses.
Working with plates of dim sum at Dragon Beaux.
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